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Alaska Science Center

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Data

This page provides public access to the digital data from USGS Alaska Science Center research. The USGS, a Bureau of the U.S. Department of the Interior, conducts objective scientific research about ecosystems, climate, energy and mineral assessments, environmental health, natural hazards, and water resources. The results of USGS research - generally released in the form of publications, maps, data, and models - are used by policymakers at all levels of government and by the private sector to support decisions about how to respond to natural risks and manage natural resources. All USGS released data sets are listed in the USGS Science Data Catalog, including those listed here.

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Total Records: 118
Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) mtDNA and Microsatellite Genetic Data, Alaska, Canada and Russia, 1880-2012

These are genetic data collected from Peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) from three subspecies present in Alaska (F.p. pealei, n = 59; F. p. anatum, n = 26; F. p. tundrius, n = 47; F. p. anatum/tundrius?, n = 10), two subspecies from Canada (F. p. tundrius, n = 18 and F. p. anatum, n = 14), one subspecies present in Russia (F. p. pealei, n = 7), and samples from the San Juan Islands, Washington (n=15) thought to be a contact zone between F. p. anatum and the North Pacific segment of F. p. pealei. Data collected from all samples include twelve microsatellite loci and DNA sequence data from 559 base pairs of domain 1 of the mtDNA control region.

Author(s): Pierson, B. J.;

DataID: 164 | doi:10.5066/F7F18WV0 | Date Posted Online: 2017-11-17 | Last Updated: 2017-11-17 12:33:23

Kasatochi Crested and Least Auklet Survey Data, 1996-2016

Crested (Aethia cristatella) and Least Auklets (Aethia pusilla) are crevice-nesting birds that breed in large mixed colonies at relatively few sites in the Aleutian Chain, Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska and Sea of Okhotsk. Time-lapse imagery of nesting habitat was collected over the summers of 2010, 2012, and 2013 to assess use of the primary pre-eruption colony site. At-sea surveys collected relative abundance data to identify shifts in distributions of Crested and Least Auklets around Kasatochi and Koniuji Islands.

Author(s): Drew, G. S.; Piatt, J. F.;

DataID: 165 | doi:10.5066/F7513WDS | Date Posted Online: 2017-11-17 | Last Updated: 2017-11-17 14:51:06

Hawaiian Coot (Fulica alai) and Hawaiian Gallinule (Gallinula galeata sandvicensis) Microsatellite and Mitochondrial DNA Data, 2014-2016, Oahu, Hawaii

This data set describes nuclear microsatellite genotypes derived from seventeen autosomal loci (Fal02, Fal04, Fal08, Fal10, Fal12, Fal14-1, Fal16, Fal19, Gch03, Gch06, Gch07, Gch12, Gch13, Gch14, Gch17, Gch19, and KiRa10) and nucleotide sequence data derived from two mitochondrial DNA loci (control region and NADH dehydrogenase 2). A total of 47 Hawaiian coots and 52 Hawaiian moorhen were examined for this study. Samples were collected on Oahu, Hawaii, United States of America. Samples used in the study originated from blood samples collected in the field from live trapped birds or from tissue taken from museum specimens according to each institution's load policies and procedures. We compared historical (samples collected in the late 1800s and early 1900s) and modern (collected in 2012-2013) populations.

Author(s): Sonsthagen, S. A.;

DataID: 163 | doi:10.5066/F74Q7SXC | Date Posted Online: 2017-10-23 | Last Updated: 2017-10-23 12:17:06

Serum Urea and Creatinine Levels of Spring-caught Polar Bears (Ursus maritimus) in the Southern Beaufort Sea, 1983-2016, and Chukchi Sea, 1987-1993

These data are serum urea nitrogen and creatinine levels for polar bears captured in the southern Beaufort Sea 1983-2016 and the Chukchi Sea 1987-1993. The dataset includes relevant information about the bears that were captured including the latitude and longitude of their capture location, capture date, age class and sex, the age and number of cubs accompanying an adult female, and whether the bear denned during the previous winter or exhibited signs of being engaged in mating behavior at the time of or just prior to capture.

Author(s): USGS Alaska Science Center, Polar Bear Research Program.;

DataID: 162 | doi:10.5066/F7SQ8XJC | Date Posted Online: 2017-10-17 | Last Updated: 2017-10-17 10:49:09

DNA Microsatellite and Sex Identification Markers for Emperor Goose (Chen canagica) and Cross-Species Amplification of Microsatellites in Select Goose Species, Alaska 2016

This data set contains allele sizes for 30 individuals of 9 previously published and 20 novel microsatellite loci and the molecular sex verification (n = 31) of Emperor Geese (Chen canagica) from various locations across Alaska. The allele sizes for the 20 microsatellite loci developed in this study are included for 10 White-fronted Geese (Anser albifrons) from Selawik, 11 Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) from Kigigak Island, 10 Canada Geese (Branta canadensis) from Copper River Delta, and 9 Cackling Geese (Branta hutchinsii) from lower Kashunuk River (Hock Slough) and Tutakoke River.

Author(s): Talbot, S. L.;

DataID: 161 | doi:10.5066/F71V5C4S | Date Posted Online: 2017-10-03 | Last Updated: 2017-10-03 14:19:31

Gulf Watch Alaska Nearshore Component: Marine Water Quality, Water Temperature from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park, 2014-2016

This data is part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, nearshore monitoring component. The data consists of date, time, and temperature measurements from intertidal rocky sampling sites. The dataset is 5 comma separated files exported from a download from the HOBO temperature logger. Sites are in Alaska and include locations in Katmai National Park and Preserve, Kenai Fjords National Park and northern and western Prince William Sound. There are five sites in each of those areas. The time interval includes 2014-2016. Temperature loggers were set to record hourly. Each file is comprised of data from a single site from a given year. Loggers were re-used so the logger serial number is included in the data file in case any anomalies are found which might be due to the logger itself.

Author(s): Monson, D. H.; Kloecker, K. A.;

DataID: 160 | doi:10.5066/F77S7KXH | Date Posted Online: 2017-09-25 | Last Updated: 2017-10-03 13:59:56

Eklutna River at Glenn Highway Bridge, Alaska Cross-Section Survey, 2016 and 2017

This dataset consists of survey data, plots, photos, and a photo index from a cross section survey of the Eklutna River at the Glenn Highway bridge in Alaska. The cross sections were surveyed in 2016 and 2017 using a total station, then adjusted to match datums for a Municipality of Anchorage orthophoto and Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities bridge as-built elevations.

Author(s): Curran, J. H.; Beebee, R. A.;

DataID: 159 | doi:10.5066/F7TT4PGD | Date Posted Online: 2017-09-20 | Last Updated: 2017-09-20 13:42:59

Gulf Watch Alaska Nearshore Component: Sea Otter Aerial Survey Data Kenai Fjords National Park, 2002-2016

These data are part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, nearshore monitoring component. Specifically, these data describe sea otter (Enhydra lutris) aerial survey observations from the waters around Kenai Fjords National Park between 2002 and 2016. Sea otters are a keystone predator, well known for structuring the nearshore marine ecosystem through their consumption of invertebrate prey. The dataset consists of 3 comma delimited files exported from Microsoft Excel. The data consists of 1. Strip transect counts, 2. Intensive Search Unit (ISU) counts, and 3. Transect coordinates. For each aerial survey, a pilot flew an airplane at an altitude of 91m over pre-determined transects while an observer searched on one side of the plane and recorded sea otter group counts and locations. Sea otters observed within 400 m of each transect were later used to estimate abundance. Sea otters sighted beyond the confines of designated transect swaths were also counted and mapped, time permitting. To estimate the number of sea otters in small groups (<20) not detected along transect swaths (e.g., due to diving behavior or the presence of kelp canopy), 400m diameter circles (i.e. ISUs) were searched intensively by periodically flying 5 concentric circles around an initiating group. These ISUs were distributed throughout the survey area in an attempt to accurately represent the full range of observation conditions encountered during the survey. When large groups of sea otters (≥20) were sighted on transect, they were circled until a complete count was made.

Author(s): Esslinger, G. G.;

DataID: 158 | doi:10.5066/F7CJ8BN7 | Date Posted Online: 2017-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-10-03 14:08:02

Influenza A Viruses and Antibody Response in High-Latitude Urban Wintering Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), Alaska, 2012-2015

This data set contains information regarding the sampling of avian influenza viruses from mallard ducks at locations in Anchorage and Fairbanks, Alaska 2012-2015. Data pertaining to wild birds (mallards) sampled includes band numbers, age and sex, location and timing of sampling. Laboratory specific data is also included and used to identify presence and absence of avian influenza viruses either during active infection or previous exposure (serostatus).

Author(s): Spivey, T. J.;

DataID: 157 | doi:10.5066/F7CZ3626 | Date Posted Online: 2017-08-10 | Last Updated: 2017-08-10 16:26:55

Raw Ground Penetrating Radar Data on North America Glaciers

U.S. Geological Survey researchers conducted time-series ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys with a Sensors and Software 500-MHz Pulse Ekko Pro system. We collected common-offset data from the ground, towed behind a researcher using a snowmobile, and from the air, strapped underneath a helicopter. We also collected common-midpoint data at specific glacier locations. All the profiles are linked to coincident GPS observations. Coincident in-situ data may provide calibration information, and may be composed of any of the following: snow pits and/or snow-pit/snow-core combinations, probe profiles, and ablation stakes. This supplemental information may provide estimates of snow properties to calibrate radar velocity.

Author(s): O'Neel, S. R.; McGrath, D.; Wolken, G. J.; Candela, S. G.; Sass, L. C.; McNeil, C. J.; Baker, E. H.; Babcock, E. L.; Loso, M. G.; Arendt, A. A.; Whorton, E. N.; Burgess, E. W.; Gusmeroli, A.;

DataID: 156 | doi:10.5066/F7M043G7 | Date Posted Online: 2017-08-08 | Last Updated: 2017-08-08 15:32:10

Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) Genetic Data, Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska (1994-1999)

These are genetic data collected from over 700 individual coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) from 17 streams and rivers within Glacier Bay Alaska and 2 rivers outside the bay. Data collected from all samples include one nuclear gene intron, Growth Hormone-1, and eight microsatellite loci.

Author(s): Pierson, B. J.;

DataID: 155 | doi:10.5066/F7V98657 | Date Posted Online: 2017-07-25 | Last Updated: 2017-07-25 16:47:13

Greater White-fronted Goose (Anser albifrons) Nest Characteristics and Nesting Behavior Classifications from Time-lapse Photographs and Nest Visit Data; Point Lonely, Alaska, 2013-2014

This data release contains three tables of information on behavior and productivity of greater white-fronted geese nesting near Point Lonely, Alaska, 2013-2014: transcriptions of nest photographs obtained by time-lapse photography at 1-minute intervals in 2013 and 2014, and characteristics of nests monitored with cameras and via periodic nest visits during 2013-2014. Data were collected as part of the USGS Changing Arctic Ecosystems Initiative to understand the effects of industrial and researcher disturbance on Arctic-nesting geese.

Author(s): Meixell, B. W.;

DataID: 154 | doi:10.5066/F7NV9GP9 | Date Posted Online: 2017-07-24 | Last Updated: 2017-07-24 09:28:47

Exit and Paradise Glacier Foreland, Alaska River and Glacier Maps, Channel Surveys, Digital Elevation Model, and Orthophoto, 1800s-2013

The dynamics of the linked river systems draining Exit and Paradise Glaciers have been dependent on glacial and fluvial controls since the 1800s. This data release contains maps of historical Exit and Paradise creek and glacier positions, 2013 channel survey and particle size data, and a 2012 digital elevation model and orthophoto for the Exit and Paradise glacier forelands, Alaska.

Author(s): Curran, J. H.; Williams, H. B.; Loso, M. G.;

DataID: 140 | doi:10.5066/F75T3HJZ | Date Posted Online: 2017-06-21 | Last Updated: 2017-06-21 15:46:22

Biogeochemical Subsidies from Glacier Runoff into Alaska Coastal Marine Food Webs, Gulf of Alaska, 2012-2013

To demonstrate connectivity between terrestrial and marine ecosystems, we used stable (δ13C, δ15N, δ2H) and radiogenic (∆14C) isotopes to estimate the relative contribution of glacier runoff and terrestrial-derived organic matter (OM) to marine food webs. This dataset contains information on isotopic signatures from dissolved organic matter (DOM), dissolved inorganic matter (DIC) and particulate organic matter (POM), mussels, plankton, fish and seabirds near tidewater glaciers during the peak melt in summer 2012-2013 in Prince William Sound and the Western Aleutians, Alaska.

Author(s): Arimitsu, M. L.; Heflin, B.; Piatt, J. F.; Hobson, K. A.; Hood, E. W.;

DataID: 139 | doi:10.5066/F7Z036D9 | Date Posted Online: 2017-06-20 | Last Updated: 2017-06-20 10:59:14

Sea Otter Gene Transcription Data from Kodiak, the Alaska Peninsula, and Prince William Sound, Alaska, 2005-2012

This data set includes capture location, date, sex, and results of molecular gene transcription analysis for sea otters (Enhydra lutris) sampled in western Prince William Sound (WPWS), Alaska and comparison samples collected from Kodiak and the Alaska Peninsula, and reference samples collected from captive animals. Samples were collected between 2005 and 2012. (Molecular gene transcription is the process by which information from the DNA template of a particular gene is transcribed into messenger RNA (mRNA) and eventually translated into a functional protein. The amount of mRNA transcribed from a particular gene is physiologically dictated. Altered levels of gene transcripts provide observable signs of health impairment.)

Author(s): Bowen, L.; Ballachey, B. E.; Bodkin, J. L.; Miles, A. K.; Esler, D.; Kloecker, K. A.;

DataID: 138 | doi:10.5066/F789141P | Date Posted Online: 2017-06-16 | Last Updated: 2017-06-16 09:09:22

Black Brant Banding and Recovery Encounter Histories, Alaska, 1990-2016

This data contains two tables of live-dead encounter histories of Black Brant geese banded 4 breeding locations in the Arctic of northern Alaska and western Canada and one sub-Arctic location, the Tutakoke River colony on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta of Alaska, from 1990 to 2016.

Author(s): Ward, D. H.;

DataID: 136 | doi:10.5066/F76971SZ | Date Posted Online: 2017-06-15 | Last Updated: 2017-06-15 11:15:05

Bluff Analysis for Potential Peregrine Falcon Nesting Locations within the National Petroleum Reserve - Alaska (NPR-A), 2002-2012

This data set refines potential peregrine falcon nest habitat within the National Petroleum Reserve - Alaska (NPR-A), aids in the interpretation of nest site selection and potential habitat based on the surface geology and geomorphology of the region, determines the key characteristics for the selection of nest sites in known nesting locations relatively to optimal sites in areas without known nesting occurrence, and helps in developing strategies for detecting potential shifts in the distribution of potential nesting habitat. Components of the data development included conducting geospatial analysis using digital elevation models, high-resolution remotely sensed imagery, and geomorphology. This GIS dataset consists of 16,141 bluff features (extracted from 5m resolution IfSAR data) and provides information on spatial geometry, relational distance information, surface geology, and other important conditions.

Author(s): Zuck, C.; Jones, B. M.; Nigro, D. A.; Ritchie, B.;

DataID: 137 | doi:10.5066/F7ZG6QRZ | Date Posted Online: 2017-06-15 | Last Updated: 2017-06-15 15:14:33

Lidar Point Cloud Data of Nogahabara Sand Dunes, Alaska; September 2015

This dataset provides information needed to reproduce a digital model of the Nogahabara Dune Field located in interior Alaska. The Nogahabara Dunes represent one of three active inland dune fields found in Alaska today. In an effort to update geospatial coverage of the dunes lidar data was collected over Nogahabara Sand Dunes in September 2015 using a 1955 Cessna 180 aircraft equipped with a Riegl brand LMS-Q240i laser scanner. The scanner was set to 10,000 laser shots per second and a +/- 30 degree beam sweep and flown over the Koyukuk National Wildlife Refuge’s Nogahabara sand dunes. The flight pattern was designed for 50 percent overlap between each adjacent swath to achieve 2 points per square meter over the entire coverage. The lidar scanner was rigidly attached to a OXTS brand Inertial+2 GPS/IMU unit, which was being fed by a Trimble R7 GPS receiver. The resultant survey achieved 1.4 points per square meter. Discrete-return point cloud data are available in the LAS format.

Author(s): Jones, B. M.; Baughman, C. A.; Larsen, C. F.;

DataID: 134 | doi:10.5066/F7QF8RB7 | Date Posted Online: 2017-06-14 | Last Updated: 2017-06-14 12:06:28

Greater White-fronted Goose (Anser albifrons) Habitat Use Data, Teshekpuk Lake Special Area, 2012-2013

This data release contains one table of data from a two-year study of Greater White-fronted Goose (Anser albifrons frontalis) molting ecology conducted in the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area within the National Petroleum Reserve - Alaska in 2012 and 2013.

Author(s): Flint, P. L.;

DataID: 135 | doi:10.5066/F7PR7TG8 | Date Posted Online: 2017-06-14 | Last Updated: 2017-06-14 12:43:45

Audio Recording Device Data for Assessing Avian Detectability, Seward Peninsula, Alaska, 2013-2014

This data set contains information from recording devices that were set to record regularly during summer breeding seasons. A single observer listened to 2692 recordings, noting which species were heard during each 10-min recording. We used this information to examine how avian detectability varied by day of season, time of day, and ambient temperature. All study locations were in northwestern Alaska, on the Seward Peninsula, and recordings were taken between May 25 and July 26 in 2013 and 2014.

Author(s): Thompson, S. J.; Handel, C. M.;

DataID: 133 | doi:10.5066/F7B856KG | Date Posted Online: 2017-06-09 | Last Updated: 2017-06-09 08:55:47

Maps of the Russian Far East (ver. 1.1, June 2017)

Three geographic maps showing the Russian Far East.

Author(s): Labay, K. A.;

DataID: 85 | doi:10.5066/F7B27SFD | Date Posted Online: 2017-06-08 | Last Updated: 2017-06-08 15:22:35

Count of Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), River Temperature, and River Height in the Pilgrim River, Nome, Alaska, 2003-2014

The dataset is the daily count of Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) passing through a fish counting weir on the Pilgrim River from 2003 to 2014. Also, included in the data set is the daily temperature and river height measured at the weir (65.103071°, -164.824046°). The fish weir was operated during the summer (late June to mid-September) by the Norton Sound Economic Development Corporation.

Author(s): Carey, M. P.; Zimmerman, C. E.;

DataID: 131 | doi:10.5066/F71834PF | Date Posted Online: 2017-05-05 | Last Updated: 2017-05-05 09:47:17

Sensor and Location data from Ear Tag PTTs Deployed on Polar Bears in the Southern Beaufort Sea 2009 to 2011

These are data collected from Wildlife Computers ear tag platform transmitter terminals (PTT) deployed on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea during the months of March, April, August, September, and October between 2009 and 2011.

Author(s): USGS Alaska Science Center, Polar Bear Research Program.;

DataID: 130 | doi:10.5066/F7057D4R | Date Posted Online: 2017-05-04 | Last Updated: 2017-05-04 13:52:34

Digital Elevation Models of Glacier Bay National Park, Between Lituya Bay and Icy Point, Alaska, Derived from Airborne Lidar Data Acquired in September 2015

This dataset provides four digital elevation models derived from airborne lidar data acquired over four separate areas along and adjacent to the Fairweather Fault along the remote Gulf of Alaska coast within Glacier Bay National Park. In 1958, the Fairweather Fault in southeast Alaska ruptured over 260 km between Yakutat Bay and Cross Sound, producing the magnitude 7.8 Lituya Bay earthquake. To better understand the extent of surface rupture and identify sites to investigate for evidence of past earthquakes, the USGS Alaska Science Center collaborated with the National Park Service, the Army Corps of Engineers' Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL), and the National Center for Airborne Lidar Mapping (NCALM) at the University of Houston to collect over 166 square kilometers of high-resolution airborne lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) data. CRREL developed and deployed the Helipod lidar system, designed for use on a Robinson R44 Raven II helicopter, to acquire more than 34.4 million laser measurements. The measurements have vertical and horizontal accuracies of +/-10 cm. NCALM processed the lidar data to remove laser returns from vegetation and enhance laser returns from the ground surface. The derivative "bare-Earth" data include 1.4 to 2.3 laser returns per square meter, which were used to produce 1-m-per-pixel digital elevation models (DEM) for four areas between Lituya Bay and Icy Point.

Author(s): Witter, R. C.; LeWinter, A.; Glennie, C.; Hauser, D.; Bender, A. M.; Finnegan, D.;

DataID: 129 | doi:10.5066/F7W094D4 | Date Posted Online: 2017-05-03 | Last Updated: 2017-11-14 16:25:38

Gulf of Alaska Shelf and Slope Iron and Nitrate Data, Copper River Region, 2010

These are data from cruises carried out in April, May and July 2010 from the Copper River (AK) mouth to beyond the shelf break, ~150 km from shore. The focus of the dataset is the iron (Fe) data, intended to help infer the processes controlling concentrations of Fe. The data include concentrations of total dissolvable Fe (TDFe), dissolved Fe (dFe), nitrate, and salinity, temperature and fluorescence data (CTD) as background. This also includes sea surface height deviation data for a two month interval when a Yakutat eddy passed by the sampling site. Also included is a simple 1-dimensional numerical model used to simulate the the April DFe data assuming a DFe flux from shelf sediments, horizontal transport by eddy diffusion, and removal by scavenging. Data from eight model simulations are also included.

Author(s): Crusius, J.; Schroth, A. W.; Resing, J. A.; Cullen, J.; Campbell, R. W.;

DataID: 128 | doi:10.5066/F7222S06 | Date Posted Online: 2017-04-28 | Last Updated: 2017-10-05 15:01:38

Gulf Watch Alaska Nearshore Component: Black Oystercatcher Nest Density and Chick Diets Data from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park, 2006-2016

This data is part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, nearshore monitoring component. Specifically, these data describe black oystercatcher nest site and chick provisioning observations conducted in the northern Gulf of Alaska within the GWA program. The data consists of three files: 1. black oystercatcher nest counts from transects surveyed in study areas, 2. black oystercatcher nest locations found along oystercatcher sampling transects and 3. species identification, counts, and sizes for hard-shelled prey remains collected from black oystercatcher nest sites.

Sampling date, nest site location, bird behavioral category, number of chicks and or eggs, presence of prey remains, and other relevant notes were recorded. Sites are in Alaska and include locations in the following blocks: Katmai National Park and Preserve, Kenai Fjords National Park and western Prince William Sound. There are five sets of oystercatcher survey transects centered around a rocky intertidal monitoring site in each block. The time interval includes 2006-2016.

The black oystercatcher was selected for inclusion into the monitoring program because: 1) it is a common and conspicuous member of the rocky and gravel intertidal marine communities of eastern Pacific shorelines, 2) it is completely dependent on nearshore marine habitats for all critical life history components including foraging, breeding, chick-rearing, and resting, 3) it serves as a "keystone"ť species that is important in structuring nearshore systems, and 4) it is highly susceptible to human disturbance. The species is considered a Management Indicator Species by the Chugach National Forest and a species of concern by the Alaska Shorebird Working Group and is widely recognized as a species representative of nearshore habitats and therefore particularly amenable to long term monitoring.

Author(s): Coletti, H. A.; Kloecker, K. A.; Robinson, B.; Esler, D.; Bodkin, J. L.;

DataID: 127 | doi:10.5066/F7WH2N5Q | Date Posted Online: 2017-04-25 | Last Updated: 2017-04-25 15:46:47

Greater White-Fronted Goose (Anser albifrons) Microsatellite DNA Data, Alaska, 1989-2006

This data set describes nuclear microsatellite genotypes derived from eight autosomal loci (BCA6, BCA9, BCA11, Aaμ1, CRG, OXY13, TSP1.20.09 and TSP1.20.46 ). A total of 115 Greater White-fronted Geese were examined for genotyping with samples coming from the three primary breeding locales within Alaska that represent the Pacific Flyway (Cook Inlet, Bristol Bay Lowlands, and the Yukon Delta, Western Alaska). The sex of most samples was determined in the field.

Author(s): Wilson, R. E.;

DataID: 126 | doi:10.5066/F71G0JGN | Date Posted Online: 2017-04-21 | Last Updated: 2017-04-24 12:22:07

Pelagic Forage Fish Distribution Abundance and Body Condition

These data are part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, pelagic monitoring component.

Author(s): Arimitsu, M. L.; Piatt, J. F.; Heflin, B.;

DataID: 117 | doi:10.5066/F74J0C9Z | Date Posted Online: 2017-04-18 | Last Updated: 2017-04-18 10:55:13

Walrus Haulout and In-water Activity Levels Relative to Sea Ice Availability in the Chukchi Sea: 2008-2014

An animal's energetic costs are dependent on the amount of time it allocates to various behavioral activities. For Arctic pinnipeds, the time allocated to active and resting behaviors could change with future reductions in sea ice cover and longer periods of open water. The Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) is a large Arctic pinniped that rests on sea ice or land between foraging trips to feed on the seafloor. This dataset contains behavioral data collected from 216 radio-tagged adult female walruses instrumented in the Chukchi Sea (2008–2014) that formed the basis of a Bayesian generalized linear mixed effects model that investigated probability that a walrus was in water foraging, in water not foraging, or hauled out, as a function of environmental covariates. The data are structured such that each line represents an hour of behavior collected during every third hour of the UTC day (hours 0 through 21), which was associated with temperature and wind metrics derived from the North American Regional Reanalysis dataset, as well as an index of the daily availability of sea ice based on the daily National Ice Center's Marginal Ice Zone product and an index of the availability of land. Each record presents the walrus behavior recorded during the record's hour, the previous hour, and the subsequent hour.

Author(s): Jay, C. V.; Taylor, R. L.; Fischbach, A. S.; Beatty, W. S.;

DataID: 116 | doi:10.5066/F7XD0ZTG | Date Posted Online: 2017-04-12 | Last Updated: 2017-04-12 12:13:17

Common Eider Blood Chemistry Data, Alaska, 2004-2006

This data set contains information on blood chemistry and hematological parameters of captive Pacific Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima v-nigrum) for reference periods and after satellite transmitter implantation.

Author(s): Petersen, M. R.;

DataID: 115 | doi:10.5066/F7MG7MR0 | Date Posted Online: 2017-04-07 | Last Updated: 2017-04-07 15:00:28

Eastern Denali Fault Surface Trace Map, Eastern Alaska and Adjacent Canada, 1978-2008

The eastern section of the Denali Fault did not rupture during the 2002 Denali Fault earthquake (Mw 7.9), however seismologic, geodetic, and geomorphic evidence along with a paleoseismic record of several past ground-rupturing earthquakes demonstrate the fault is active. Thick vegetation, along with complex glacial landforms, large braided rivers, and fault-parallel bedrock structure (e.g., bedding) obscure the Eastern Denali Fault's surface expression. Plafker and Clague mapped the fault in Alaska and Yukon respectively, providing the basis for generalized digital maps of the structure. While the generalized fault trace maps provide basic information for seismic hazard models (i.e., approximate fault location, total length), detailed fault trace maps may reveal information about past rupture length and offset, complementing paleoseismic information and informing future field investigations.

Author(s): Bender, A. M.; Haeussler, P. J.;

DataID: 111 | doi:10.5066/F7T151WC | Date Posted Online: 2017-04-05 | Last Updated: 2017-05-26 11:44:48

West Twin Creek Alaska Subsurface Bromide Tracer Experiment, 2015

This data was produced as part of a subsurface tracer experiment performed on a boreal hillslope in July, 2015. The data is separated into three files: 'Well Data.csv' includes the location and depth of well screens, concentrations of the bromide tracer in time, saturation state of the subsurface at the wells, ground cover at the wells, and depth of the organic-mineral boundary which controls shallow flow. 'Probe data.csv' includes thaw depth, gravel presence, and vegetation type within the well field. 'Breakthroughs.csv' includes solute concentrations in time from wells that displayed robust breakthroughs. The data includes electrical conductivity and bromide measurements, and a column that combines these two solutes based on a significant linear relationship between the two.

Author(s): Koch, J. C.;

DataID: 110 | doi:10.5066/F70C4T0V | Date Posted Online: 2017-04-04 | Last Updated: 2017-04-04 11:28:49

Assessment of Contemporary Genetic Diversity and Inter-Taxa/Inter-Region Exchange of Avian Paramyxovirus Serotype 1 in Wild Birds Sampled in North America, 1986-2014

Data set pertaining to avian paramyxovirus (APMV-1) sequences used in phylogenetic analyses. Data contains GenBank Accession numbers, host species common name and taxonomic order, collection year, and collection location.

Author(s): Ramey, A. M.;

DataID: 109 | doi:10.5066/F7MP51GP | Date Posted Online: 2017-03-31 | Last Updated: 2017-03-31 10:05:21

Bering Land Bridge Lake Classification; Seward Peninsula, Alaska, 2012-2016

This study focuses on a 67 attribute lake cover classification scheme covering the Bering Land Bridge area of the Seward Peninsula, Alaska. The GIS dataset consists of 5170 lakes (which were extracted from a 5m resolution ifSAR/orthophoto image) and provides information on lake morphometry, hydrologic connectivity, surface area dynamics, surrounding terrestrial ecotypes, bedfast percentage, and other important conditions. The Seward Peninsula lake habitat study classification system provides lake specific information for a coastal peninsula area that will guide research and aid in the management of the natural environment.

Author(s): Zuck, C.; Jones, B. M.; Arp, C. D.; Engram, M.;

DataID: 108 | doi:10.5066/F7DF6PF6 | Date Posted Online: 2017-03-28 | Last Updated: 2017-03-28 13:38:17

Gulf Watch Alaska Nearshore Component: Monitoring Site Locations from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park

These data are part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, nearshore monitoring component. Specifically, these data describe site locations for rocky intertidal, mussel sampling, soft sediment bivalve sampling, and eelgrass bed sampling in the northern Gulf of Alaska within the GWA program. The dataset consists of two comma separated files exported from a Microsoft Excel workbook. The data consists of 1. rocky intertidal, mussel sampling, and soft sediment site location information, and 2. eelgrass bed locations. Sampling will be conducted in Katmai National Park and Preserve (KATM), Kenai Fjords National Park (KEFJ), Prince William Sound (PWS) and to a lesser extent on the Lake Clark National Park and Preserve (LACL). Sites from a related project that provides similar data from Kachemak Bay (KBAY) are included here.

Author(s): Coletti, H. A.; Kloecker, K. A.; Bodkin, J. L.; Dean, T. A.;

DataID: 107 | doi:10.5066/F78S4N3R | Date Posted Online: 2017-03-07 | Last Updated: 2017-03-21 14:03:13

Gulf Watch Alaska, Nearshore Monitoring Component: Sea Otter Foraging Observations from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park, 2012-2016

This data is part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, benthic monitoring component and a seasonal diet study in Kenai Fjords National Park. The dataset is a comma separated file exported from a Microsoft Access database. The data consists of observations made of foraging sea otters (Enhydra lutris). Observers used Questar field model spotting scopes and binoculars to identify prey. Date, local time, dive duration, success, prey type, prey size, prey number, handling time and surface time are all recorded. Sites are in Alaska and include locations in Katmai National Park and Preserve, Kenai Fjords National Park and Prince William Sound. This data in this file were collected 2012-2016.

Author(s): Kloecker, K. A.; Monson, D. H.;

DataID: 106 | doi:10.5066/F7N29V4R | Date Posted Online: 2017-03-03 | Last Updated: 2017-04-25 16:52:23

Summer Activity Sensor Data from Collars Deployed on Female Polar Bears in the Chukchi Sea 1989 to 1995 and Southern Beaufort Sea 1989 to 2014

These are data collected from two types of activity sensors housed within collars deployed on female polar bears in the Chukchi and southern Beaufort Seas during the months of July through October between 1989 and 2014. Mercury tip-switches were deployed 1989 to 2009 and accelerometers were deployed 2009-2014. Activity sensor readings were related to habitats used by polar bears as described in the methods below.

Author(s): USGS Alaska Science Center, Polar Bear Research Program.;

DataID: 105 | doi:10.5066/F7B27SCH | Date Posted Online: 2017-03-02 | Last Updated: 2017-03-21 14:03:04

Goose Mass and Vegetation Data, Colville River Delta, Alaska, 2012-2014

This data release contains three tables of information from the Colville River Delta, Alaska, 2012-2014: offtake of Carex subspathacea, standing crop of C. subspathacea, and snow goose and black brant gosling mass data. Data were collected as part of the USGS Changing Arctic Ecosystems Initiative to understand the response of wildlife to rapid physical changes taking place in the Arctic.

Author(s): Hupp, J. W.;

DataID: 103 | doi:10.5066/F72J692N | Date Posted Online: 2017-02-21 | Last Updated: 2017-03-28 09:53:04

Gulf Watch Alaska Nearshore Component: Intertidal Mussel Site Data from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park, 2016

This data is part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, nearshore monitoring component. Specifically, these data describe mussel sampling and observations conducted in the northern Gulf of Alaska within the GWA program. The dataset consists of five comma separated files exported from a Microsoft excel workbook. The data consists of 1. Mussel sampling site layout information, 2. Mussel count and 3. Size measurements for mussels greater than 20 millimeters, 4. Mussel count and 5. Size measurements for all mussels collected from core samples. Samplers used transect tapes, quadrat frames, rulers, and core tools to sample mussels from mussel sites. Mussels greater than 20 millimeters were collected from a quadrat and measured with dial calipers to the nearest millimeter. Associated with the quadrat, but not within it, a small core sample was collected and all mussels greater than 1mm were counted and measured (measurements began in 2014). Sampling year, region, block, site, quadrat number, quadrat size (overall area sampled), and number of mussels in the core were recorded. Sites are in Alaska and include locations in Katmai National Park and Preserve, Kenai Fjords National Park and Prince William Sound. There are five mussel sites in each of those three regions. The time interval includes 2016. Pacific blue mussels (Mytilus trossulus) are a conspicuous and abundant filter feeding marine invertebrate in the intertidal zone. Mussels are widely distributed, but also form relatively monotypic stands of larger individuals that are termed mussel beds. Although a number of factors such as environment, disturbance, predation and competition influence the abundance and distribution of mussels, they can be a competitively dominant intertidal species. Within the nearshore foodweb, mussels area a source of energy to a wide array of invertebrate, avian, and mammalian predators and are critically important prey for sea otters, black oystercatchers, harlequin ducks, Barrows goldeneye, and several species of sea stars.

Author(s): Kloecker, K. A.; Ballachey, B. E.; Bodkin, J. L.; Coletti, H. A.;

DataID: 104 | doi:10.5066/F7WS8RD4 | Date Posted Online: 2017-02-21 | Last Updated: 2017-03-21 14:03:03

Influence of Glacier Run Off on Ecosystem Structure in Gulf of Alaska Fjords 2004-2011

Marine ecosystems respond to a range of habitat variability in coastal zones modified by glacial freshwater outflows, biophysical data were collected in three study regions that included four major glacial fjord systems around the Gulf of Alaska. A suite of geographic, oceanographic, nutrient and biological attributes were sampled at these three study regions during peak ice-melt season in summer.

Author(s): Arimitsu, M. L.; Piatt, J. F.; Heflin, B.;

DataID: 95 | doi:10.5066/F7K072DR | Date Posted Online: 2017-02-10 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:27:35

Blood Parasite Infection Data from Blue-winged Teal, Canada (Alberta, Saskatchewan) and USA (Texas, Louisiana), 2012-2013

This data set includes age, sex, location, and blood parasite infection data from Blue-winged teal (Anas discors) captured in Canada (Alberta, Saskatchewan) and the USA (Texas, Louisiana) in 2012-2013. Infection data for three different genera of blood parasites are given as are GenBank accession numbers for genetic sequences obtained from positive infections.

Author(s): Reed, J. A.;

DataID: 94 | doi:10.5066/F79C6VMW | Date Posted Online: 2017-02-09 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:27:34

Point Measurements of Surface Mass Balance, Eklutna Glacier, Alaska, 2008-2015

This data set consists of a time-series of direct measurements of glacier surface mass balance, at Eklutna Glacier, Alaska. It includes seasonal measurements of winter snow accumulation and summer snow and ice ablation.

Author(s): Sass, L. C.; Loso, M. G.; Geck, J.;

DataID: 91 | doi:10.5066/F7MP51CB | Date Posted Online: 2017-01-12 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:26:46

Fatty acid signature data of Chukchi Sea polar bears, 2008-2015

This dataset contains fatty acid data expressed as mass percent of total fatty acids for Chukchi Sea polar bears.

Author(s): Regehr, E. V.; Wilson, R. R.; St. Martin, M.; Rode, K. D.;

DataID: 90 | doi:10.5066/F7J38QP9 | Date Posted Online: 2017-01-11 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:41

Avian Point Count, Habitat, and Covariate Data for Subarctic Bird Abundance, Seward Peninsula, Alaska, 2012-2014

This data release contains three tables of information: avian counts by species, habitat type, a covariate information used for analysis of bird surveys conducted between 2012 and 2014 on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, as part of the USGS Changing Arctic Ecosystems Initiative. We conducted 1,208 point counts on 12 study blocks from 2012-2014 in northwestern Alaska, using repeated surveys to account for imperfect detection of birds. We considered the importance of shrub height, density of low and tall shrubs (i.e. shrubs >0.5 m tall), percent of ground cover attributed to shrubs (including dwarf shrubs <0.5 m tall), and percent of herbaceous plant cover in predicting bird abundance.

Author(s): Thompson, S. J.; Handel, C. M.;

DataID: 89 | doi:10.5066/F7CN722Z | Date Posted Online: 2017-01-04 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:38

Denning Behavior Classifications Using Temperature Sensor Data on Collars Deployed on Polar Bears in the Southern Beaufort Sea, 1986-2013

These data include two spreadsheets. The first is average daily temperatures received via satellite transmitting collars deployed on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea 1986-2013. The second is denning classifications for adult female polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea using the temperature data. Denning was classified using a control chart-based algorithm applied to the temperature data received from the collars. This method was validated by comparisons with a previous study, direct observations during flights to track collared bears, and observations of females with newborn cubs the following spring. Further information is available in the methods.

Author(s): USGS Alaska Science Center, Polar Bear Research Program.;

DataID: 88 | doi:10.5066/F7BP00Z5 | Date Posted Online: 2017-01-03 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:37

Harlequin duck capture and EROD activity data from Prince William Sound, Alaska, 2011, 2013, 2014

This data set includes capture information and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity results for harlequin ducks sampled during March 2011, 2013, and 2014 in western Prince William Sound, Alaska.

Author(s): Esler, D.;

DataID: 87 | doi:10.5066/F7KD1W1M | Date Posted Online: 2016-12-13 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:35

Specimen and Genetic Information for Phylogeny of Blue-winged Ducks (Anas spp.), 2001-2011

Data set containing specimen information and GenBank accession numbers for five nuclear DNA introns and mitochondrial DNA control region sequence information for the blue-winged duck complex of species sampled in Africa, Asia, Australia, and North and South America.

Author(s): Wilson, R. E.;

DataID: 86 | doi:10.5066/F7T72FK7 | Date Posted Online: 2016-11-28 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:19

Fatty acid signature data of potential yellow-billed loon prey in the Arctic coastal plain of Alaska, 2009-2011

This dataset contains fatty acid data expressed as mass percent of total fatty acids for several species potentially preyed upon by yellow-billed loons. These data were utilized in a quantitative fatty acid signature analysis to estimate the diet of yellow-billed loons nesting on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska (Haynes et al. 2015).

Author(s): Haynes, T. B.; Schmutz, J. A.; Bromaghin, J. F.; Iverson, S. J.; Padula, V. M.; Rosenberger, A. E.;

DataID: 84 | doi:10.5066/F7H993BH | Date Posted Online: 2016-10-17 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:18

Gulf Watch Alaska Benthic Component: Marine Water Quality, Water Temperature from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park, 2006-2014

This data is part of the GulfWatch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, benthic monitoring component. The data consists of date, time, and temperature measurements from intertidal rocky sampling sites. The site name is part of the file name. The dataset is several comma separated files exported from a download from the HOBO temperature logger. Sites are in Alaska and include locations in Katmai National Park and Preserve, Kenai Fjords National Park and eastern, northern, and western Prince William Sound. There are five sites in each of those areas. The time interval includes 2006-2015. As the temperature logging protocol was developed different monitoring intervals were used. Most temperature loggers were set to record hourly, although intervals of 20 and 30 minutes were also used. Since each file is comprised of data downloaded from different loggers, the interval can vary within an individual file.

Author(s): Monson, D. H.; Kloecker, K. A.; Ballachey, B. E.; Bodkin, J. L.; Coletti, H. A.; Dean, T. A.; Esler, D.; Esslinger, G. G.; Paszalek, J.; Weitzman, B. P.;

DataID: 83 | doi:10.5066/F7WH2N3T | Date Posted Online: 2016-09-30 | Last Updated: 2017-10-03 14:07:05

Walrus used and available resource units for northeast Chukchi Sea, 2008-2012

Sea ice loss represents a stressor to the Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens), which feeds on benthic macroinvertebrates in the Bering and Chukchi seas. However, no studies have examined the effects of sea ice on foraging walrus space use patterns. Thus, we examined walrus foraging resource selection as a function of proximity to resting substrates and prey biomass with a matched use-availability design. We quantified biomass of 17 benthic taxa, which included amphipods, bivalves, polychaete, sand dollars, tunicates, and sipunculids. We included covariates for distance to sea ice and distance to land, and systematically developed a series of candidate models to examine interactions among benthic prey biomass and resting substrates. We ranked candidate models with Bayesian Information Criterion and made inferences on walrus resource selection based on the top-ranked model. Biomass of the bivalve family Tellinidae, distance to ice, distance to land, and the interaction of distances to ice and land were in the top-ranked model. Standardized model coefficients indicated that distance to ice explained the most variation in walrus foraging resource selection patterns followed by Tellinidae biomass. Distance to land and the interaction of distances to ice and land accounted for similar levels of variation in foraging walrus resource selection. These data represent the used and available resource units with the covariates of distance to land and distance to ice.

Author(s): Beatty, W. S.; Jay, C. V.; Fischbach, A. S.; Grebmeier, J. M.; Taylor, R. L.; Blanchard, A. L.; Jewett, S. C.;

DataID: 82 | doi:10.5066/F78G8HTX | Date Posted Online: 2016-09-12 | Last Updated: 2017-04-24 16:37:19

Gulf Watch Alaska Nearshore Component: Intertidal Mussel Site Data from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park, 2008-2015

This data is part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, nearshore monitoring component. Specifically, these data describe mussel sampling and observations conducted in the northern Gulf of Alaska within the GWA program. The dataset consists of five comma separated files exported from a microsoft excel workbook. The data consists of 1. mussel sampling site layout information, 2. mussel count and 3. size measurements for mussels greater than 20 millimeters, 4. mussel count and 5. size measurements for all mussels collected from core samples. Samplers used transect tapes, quadrat frames, rulers, and core tools to sample mussels from mussel sites. Mussels greater than 20 millimeters were collected from a quadrat and measured with dial calipers to the nearest millimeter. Associated with the quadrat, but not within it, a small core sample was collected and all mussels greater than 1mm were counted and measured (measurements began in 2014). Sampling year, region, block, site, quadrat number, quardrat size (overall area sampled), and number of mussels in the core were recorded. Sites are in Alaska and include locations in Katmai National Park and Preserve, Kenai Fjords National Park and Prince William Sound. There are five mussel sites in each of those three regions. The time interval includes 2008-2015. Pacific blue mussels (Mytilus trossulus) are a conspicuous and abundant filter feeding marine invertebrate in the intertidal zone. Mussels are widely distributed, but also form relatively monotypic stands of larger individuals that are termed mussel beds. Although a number of factors such as environment, disturbance, predation and competition influence the abundance and distribution of mussels, they can be a competitively dominant intertidal species. Within the nearshore foodweb, mussels area a source of energy to a wide array of invertebrate, avian, and mammalian predators and are critically important prey for sea otters, black oystercatchers, harlequin ducks, Barrows goldeneye, and several species of sea stars.

Author(s): Kloecker, K. A.; Ballachey, B. E.; Bodkin, J. L.; Coletti, H. A.; Dean, T. A.; Esler, D.; Esslinger, G. G.; Lindeberg, M. R.; Monson, D. H.; Paszalek, J.; Weitzman, B. P.;

DataID: 80 | doi:10.5066/F7FN1498 | Date Posted Online: 2016-08-24 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:15

Glacier-Wide Mass Balance and Input Data: Alaska Benchmark Glaciers, 1966-2016

Since the late 1950s, USGS has maintained a long-term glacier mass-balance program at three North American glaciers. Similar measurements began at Sperry Glacier, MT in 2005. Direct field measurements are combined with weather data and imagery analyses to estimate the seasonal and annual mass balance at each glacier in both a conventional and reference surface format (Cogley and others, 2011). The analysis framework (van Beusekom and others, 2010; O’Neel and others, 2014) is identical at each glacier to enable cross-comparison between output time series. Vocabulary used follows Cogley and others (2011) Glossary of glacier mass balance. Phase one of this data release will include input and output files from the USGS Alaska Benchmark Glacier Program. Three types of input are provided for Wolverine and Gulkana glaciers: 1) time-variable Accumulation Area Distribution; 2) time series of point water balance at three index sites on each glacier (with secondary sites given in recent years); 3) weather data from stations installed along the glacier margins. Two solution sets are output for each glacier: 1) Conventional glacier-wide mass balance from direct observations; 2) Geodetically calibrated, conventional glacier-wide mass balance, which represents our preferred solution. The USGS runs an analysis code to transform the three input data to the output data that will be included in Phase three of this data release. Output data represent surface mass balance estimates. We do not account for basal or englacial accumulation or ablation. Mass balances are reported in water equivalent (w.e.) units, and often represent integration of multiple field measurements. Whenever possible, we average multiple field measurements to account for surface roughness and measurement errors. These 'unprocessed observables' will form the basis of Phase two of this data release.

Author(s): O'Neel, S. R.; Sass, L. C.; McNeil, C. J.; McGrath, D.;

DataID: 79 | doi:10.5066/F7HD7SRF | Date Posted Online: 2016-08-11 | Last Updated: 2017-09-01 11:50:23

Fish Creek Watershed Lake Classification; NPRA, Alaska, 2016

This study focuses on the development of a 20 attribute lake cover classification scheme for the Fish Creek Watershed (FCW), which is located in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A). The GIS dataset consists of 4,362 lakes (which were extracted from a 5m resolution IfSAR/orthophoto image) covering 18% of the 4,900 km2 FCW and provides information on lake morphometry, hydrologic connectivity, surface area dynamics, surrounding terrestrial ecotypes, and other important aquatic conditions. The FCW lake cover classification scheme provides lake specific information for an arctic watershed that will guide research and aid in the management of the natural and human-modified environment.

Project Page: Fish Creek Watershed Observatory

Author(s): Jones, B. M.; Zuck, C.;

DataID: 78 | doi:10.5066/F7H70CXB | Date Posted Online: 2016-08-10 | Last Updated: 2017-07-11 10:40:08

Arctic cisco stable isotope data, Prudhoe Bay, August 2009

This data set documents the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of age-0 Arctic cisco (Coregonus autumnalis) captured in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in August 2009. The analysis of this data was published in von Biela et al. 2013 (Polar Biology 36:137-146, doi:10.1007/s00300-012-1244-x). All stable isotope results were provided by the University of Alaska Anchorage Environmental and Natural Resources Institute (ENRI) Stable Isotope Laboratory. The Stable Isotope Facility was led by Dr. Jeffery Welker and managed by Brian Cohn at the time of the analysis.

Author(s): von Biela, V. R.; Zimmerman, C. E.; Cohn, B. R.; Welker, J. M.;

DataID: 76 | doi:10.5066/F7CZ3571 | Date Posted Online: 2016-08-04 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:10

Arctic cisco stomach content data, Prudhoe Bay, August 2009

This data set documents the stomach contents of age-0 Arctic cisco (Coregonus autumnalis) captured in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in August 2009. The analysis of this data was published in von Biela et al. 2013 (Polar Biology 36:137-146, doi:10.1007/s00300-012-1244-x). The data consists of counts of specific zooplankton taxa from individual fish stomachs.

Author(s): von Biela, V. R.; Zimmerman, C. E.; Cohn, B. R.; Welker, J. M.;

DataID: 77 | doi:10.5066/F74F1NVS | Date Posted Online: 2016-08-04 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:11

Walrus Bayesian State-space Model Output from the Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea, 2008-2012

State-space models offer researchers an objective approach to modeling complex animal location datasets, and state-space model behavior classifications are often assumed to have a link to animal behavior. We evaluated the behavioral classification accuracy of a Bayesian state-space model in Pacific walruses using Argos satellite tags outfitted with sensors to detect animal behavior in real time. Specifically, tags were targeted to attach midway between the shoulders and each tag had a conductivity sensor and pressure transducer sensor integrated with an Argos satellite telemetry tag. At 1 s intervals, the pressure transducer recorded the depth of the tag and the conductivity sensor indicated whether the tag was in salt water. Two simple algorithms that ran onboard the tag summarized behavior information within 1-hr intervals to facilitate behavior data transmission through the Argos system using two indicator variables. One algorithm set the forage indicator variable to 1 if >50% of depth measurements exceeded 10 m during a 1-hr interval and to 0 if otherwise. A second algorithm set the wet indicator variable to 1 if >10% of conductivity measurements indicated the tag was in salt water during that 1-hr interval and to 0 if otherwise. Based on the values of these two indicator variables, we categorized each 1-hr interval into one of three behavior states. A combination of wet = 0 and forage = 0 for a 1-hr interval indicated the animal was primarily hauled-out during that period. Variable indicators of wet = 1 and forage = 0 indicated a walrus was primarily in water and not foraging (swimming) during the associated 1-hr interval. Finally, combinations of wet = 1 and foraging = 1 represented an individual foraging at depth for the corresponding 1-hr interval. To compare these real behaviors to modeled behaviors, we fit a two-state discrete-time continuous-space Bayesian state-space model to data from 306 Pacific walruses tagged in the Chukchi Sea. We matched predicted locations and behaviors from the state-space model (resident, transient behavior) to true animal behavior (foraging, swimming, hauled-out) and evaluated classification accuracy with kappa statistics and root mean square error. These data represent Bayesian state-space model output for 8 hr and 12 hr time steps.

Author(s): Beatty, W. S.; Jay, C. V.; Fischbach, A. S.;

DataID: 75 | doi:10.5066/F77M060G | Date Posted Online: 2016-07-25 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:09

Pacific Walrus Coastal Haulout Database 1852-2016

We summarize available information on Pacific walrus haulouts from available reports, interviews with coastal residents and aviators, and personal observations of the authors. We provide this in the form of a georeferenced database that may be queried and displayed with standard geographic information system and database management software. The database contains 150 records of Pacific walrus haulouts, with a summary of basic characteristics on maximum haulout size, age-sex composition, season of use, and decade of most recent use. Citations to reports are provided as a bibliographic database.

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Author(s): Fischbach, A. S.; Kochnev, A. A.; Garlich-Miller, J. L.; Jay, C. V.;

DataID: 74 | doi:10.5066/F7RX994P | Date Posted Online: 2016-07-18 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:08

Bristle-thighed Curlew Capture Data from James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, O'ahu, Hawaii, 2012-2014

This data set contains banding, morphology, and satellite telemetry information for Bristle-thighed curlews (Numenius tahitiensis) that were captured between 2012 and 2014 on the James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge on the island of O'ahu, Hawaii (21.68 N, -157.95 W).

Author(s): Tibbitts, T. L.;

DataID: 73 | doi:10.5066/F7WS8RB7 | Date Posted Online: 2016-07-11 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:08

Migratory Bird Avian Influenza Sampling; Yukon Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska, 2015

Data set containing avian influenza sampling information for spring and summer waterbirds on the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta, 2015. Data contains sample ID, species common name, age and sex, collection data and location, and laboratory specific data used to identify presence and absence of avian influenza viruses.

Author(s): Ramey, A. M.;

DataID: 72 | doi:10.5066/F7SB43V5 | Date Posted Online: 2016-06-22 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:57

Morphology and Disease Information from Waterfowl, Interior Alaska, 2010

This data set includes data from five waterfowl species (northern pintail, American wigeon, lesser scaup, green-winged teal and mallard) that were captured in Interior Alaska in 2010, then measured and sampled for blood parasite and avian influenza infections.

Author(s): Meixell, B. W.;

DataID: 70 | doi:10.5066/F7QJ7FD2 | Date Posted Online: 2016-06-06 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:05

Larus Gull Microsatellite DNA Data, 2006-2009

This data set describes nuclear microsatellite genotypes derived from eleven autosomal loci (Hg16, Hg18, Hg25, K16, Lar12, Lar19, Lar24, Lar26, Rbg13, Rbg18, and Rbg29). A total of 651 Larus gulls were examined for this study with samples collected throughout North America, Europe, Russia, and South America.

Author(s): Sonsthagen, S. A.;

DataID: 68 | doi:10.5066/F74X55WS | Date Posted Online: 2016-05-18 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:03

Waterfowl Counts and Wildfire Burn Data from the Western Boreal Forest of North America, 1955-2014

The project utilized data from the Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey, which is an annual survey conducted since 1955 by the governments of the United States and Canada to monitor waterfowl populations. These survey data were spatially and temporally layered onto long-term databases of fire perimeters for Alaska and western Canada, providing a record of waterfowl transects which had burned over the last 60 years. The project modelled abundance of dabbler and diver pairs in relation to time since fire, looking at short-term (e.g., 1–3 years) versus long-term timeframes (e.g., >5 years), and in relation to fire extent, defined as the percent of transect which had burned.

Author(s): Lewis, T. L.;

DataID: 69 | doi:10.5066/F7RR1WBN | Date Posted Online: 2016-05-18 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:04

Stable Isotope Data from Diets and Tissues of Captive Bears Fed Experimental Diets

This dataset contains stable isotope incorporation and discrimination results for several sets of feeding experiments with captive brown and polar bears. Experiments were designed to determine the effects of dietary lipid content and fasting behavior on discrimination in blood, hair, and fat. Data are divided into three components of the study: one to estimate isotopic discrimination with varying dietary lipid content, one to estimate the potential effects of fasting on tissue isotope values, and one to determine incorporation rates of isotopes in various tissues. The experiments were conducted between 2009 and 2013 with captive grizzly bears at Washington State University and captive polar bears at the Oregon and Alaska zoos.

Author(s): Rode, K. D.;

DataID: 67 | doi:10.5066/F79W0CJ3 | Date Posted Online: 2016-04-21 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:01

Eelgrass (Zostera marina) Microsatellite DNA Data; Pacific Coast of North America, 2000-2009

This data set contains genetic information collected from eelgrass (Zostera marina) populations along the Pacific coast of North America from Alaska to Baha California. A total of 447 samples were collected comprising 401 unique individuals (genets) and 46 clones (ramets) from which 10 microsatellite DNA loci were obtained.

Author(s): Talbot, S. L.; Ward, D. H.;

DataID: 66 | doi:10.5066/F7GQ6VTK | Date Posted Online: 2016-04-18 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:25:00

Spectacled Eider Nesting, Capture, Banding, Mark & Resight Records, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska, 1991-2004

These are body morphometric measurement and location data associated with marked Spectacled Eiders, captured near the Kashunuk River, within the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska.

Author(s): Flint, P. L.; Petersen, M. R.;

DataID: 65 | doi:10.5066/F74B2ZCK | Date Posted Online: 2016-03-14 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:57

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) Microsatellite DNA Data; Alaska, Canada, Russia, 1994-2002

This data set describes nuclear microsatellite genotypes derived from twelve autosomal loci (6AB, Aph02, Aph08, Aph19, Aph23, Bca10, Bca11, Hhi5, Sfi11, Smo07, Smo09, and CRG), and two Z-linked microsatellite loci (Bca4 and Smo1). A total of 111 Long-tailed Ducks were examined for this genotyping with samples coming from the two primary breeding locales within Alaska (Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska and the Yukon Delta, Western Alaska) and a representative locale in the central Canadian Arctic (Queen Maud Gulf Bird Sanctuary, Nunavut, Canada). The sex of most samples was determined in the field by plumage and later confirmed by using the CHD molecular sexing protocol (Griffiths et al., 1998).

Author(s): Wilson, R. E.; Talbot, S. L.;

DataID: 60 | doi:10.5066/F7HX19RJ | Date Posted Online: 2016-02-01 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:55

Recreation Survey Results in Brown Bear Habitats, 2013

These data are the results of a modified Delphi survey in which expert opinion was solicited on the occurrence and frequency of recreational activities in brown bear habitats and their potential impacts. Twelve bear experts were surveyed and identified by either 1) their scientific publications on the impacts of one or more human recreational activity on bears, or 2) their experience in managing bear populations impacted by human recreational activities. Respondents were asked to estimate the frequency of each identified recreational activity for the bear populations they have experience with, estimate the proportion of each specific bear population exposed to each activity, and indicate the potential impacts of recreational activities in those bear populations. The frequency of occurrence of a recreational activity category and the proportion of the bear population exposed are reported from the final survey. We report the percentage of experts that noted potential for an impact on reduced survival, decreased nutritional intake, displacement, and reduced reproduction.

Author(s): Fortin-Noreus, J. K.; Rode, K. D.; Hilderbrand, G. V.; Wilder, J.; Farley, S. D.; Jorgensen, C. L.; Marcot, B. G.;

DataID: 55 | doi:10.5066/F71V5C1F | Date Posted Online: 2015-10-28 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:54

Chukchi Sea Polar Bear Location Data 1985-1996

These data are the raw location data collected from satellite radio-collars fitted on adult female polar bears in the Chukchi Sea, between 1985-1996. The collars were worn by adult female polar bears ranging within the Chukchi Sea subpopulation boundaries as identified by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s Polar Bear Specialist Group. ARGOS collars were programmed to transmit for 8 hours centered on 0:00 UTC once every three days. Thus, for two consecutive days the ARGOS collar did not transmit location data.

Author(s): Rode, K. D.;

DataID: 54 | doi:10.5066/F7BZ643N | Date Posted Online: 2015-10-25 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:53

Raw Ground Penetrating Radar Data, Eklutna Glacier, Alaska; 2013

Common-offset GPR surveys were conducted with a Sensors and Software 500-MHz Pulse Ekko Pro system. We collected data from the ground, towed behind a researcher on skis or snowmobile, and from the air, strapped underneath a helicopter. All of the profiles are linked to coincident GPS observations. Coincident in-situ data is provided for calibration, and may be composed of any of the following: snow pits and/or snow-pit/snow-core combinations, probe profiles, and ablation stakes. This supplemental information may be used to calibrate velocity for conversion from time domain to depth domain. This supplemental information is provided as is, with additional information specific to usage included within the in-situ folder.

Author(s): Candela, S. G.; McGrath, D.; McNeil, C. J.; O'Neel, S. R.; Sass, L. C.; Wolken, G. J.; Loso, M. G.;

DataID: 47 | doi:10.5066/F7F769M4 | Date Posted Online: 2015-08-25 | Last Updated: 2017-08-08 15:34:00

Raw Ground Penetrating Radar Data, Eureka Glacier, Alaska; 2013

Common-offset GPR surveys were conducted with a Sensors and Software 500-MHz Pulse Ekko Pro system. We collected data from the ground, towed behind a researcher on skis or snowmobile, and from the air, strapped underneath a helicopter. All of the profiles are linked to coincident GPS observations. Coincident in-situ data is provided for calibration, and may be composed of any of the following: snow pits and/or snow-pit/snow-core combinations, probe profiles, and ablation stakes. This supplemental information may be used to calibrate velocity for conversion from time domain to depth domain. This supplemental information is provided as is, with additional information specific to usage included within the in-situ folder.

Author(s): Candela, S. G.; McGrath, D.; McNeil, C. J.; O'Neel, S. R.; Sass, L. C.; Wolken, G. J.; Loso, M. G.;

DataID: 48 | doi:10.5066/F7Z60M35 | Date Posted Online: 2015-08-25 | Last Updated: 2017-08-08 15:34:02

Raw Ground Penetrating Radar Data, Gulkana Glacier, Alaska; 2013

Common-offset GPR surveys were conducted with a Sensors and Software 500-MHz Pulse Ekko Pro system. We collected data from the ground, towed behind a researcher on skis or snowmobile, and from the air, strapped underneath a helicopter. All of the profiles are linked to coincident GPS observations. Coincident in-situ data is provided for calibration, and may be composed of any of the following: snow pits and/or snow-pit/snow-core combinations, probe profiles, and ablation stakes. This supplemental information may be used to calibrate velocity for conversion from time domain to depth domain. This supplemental information is provided as is, with additional information specific to usage included within the in-situ folder.

Author(s): Candela, S. G.; McGrath, D.; McNeil, C. J.; O'Neel, S. R.; Sass, L. C.; Wolken, G. J.; Loso, M. G.;

DataID: 49 | doi:10.5066/F7TH8JRR | Date Posted Online: 2015-08-25 | Last Updated: 2017-08-08 15:34:04

Raw Ground Penetrating Radar Data, Scott Glacier, Alaska; 2013

Common-offset GPR surveys were conducted with a Sensors and Software 500-MHz Pulse Ekko Pro system. We collected data from the ground, towed behind a researcher on skis or snowmobile, and from the air, strapped underneath a helicopter. All of the profiles are linked to coincident GPS observations. Coincident in-situ data is provided for calibration, and may be composed of any of the following: snow pits and/or snow-pit/snow-core combinations, probe profiles, and ablation stakes. This supplemental information may be used to calibrate velocity for conversion from time domain to depth domain. This supplemental information is provided as is, with additional information specific to usage included within the in-situ folder.

Author(s): Candela, S. G.; McGrath, D.; McNeil, C. J.; O'Neel, S. R.; Sass, L. C.; Wolken, G. J.; Loso, M. G.;

DataID: 50 | doi:10.5066/F76Q1V81 | Date Posted Online: 2015-08-25 | Last Updated: 2017-08-08 15:34:07

Raw Ground Penetrating Radar Data, Taku Glacier, Alaska; 2013

Common-offset GPR surveys were conducted with a Sensors and Software 500-MHz Pulse Ekko Pro system. We collected data from the ground, towed behind a researcher on skis or snowmobile, and from the air, strapped underneath a helicopter. All of the profiles are linked to coincident GPS observations. Coincident in-situ data is provided for calibration, and may be composed of any of the following: snow pits and/or snow-pit/snow-core combinations, probe profiles, and ablation stakes. This supplemental information may be used to calibrate velocity for conversion from time domain to depth domain. This supplemental information is provided as is, with additional information specific to usage included within the in-situ folder.

Author(s): Candela, S. G.; McGrath, D.; McNeil, C. J.; O'Neel, S. R.; Sass, L. C.; Wolken, G. J.; Loso, M. G.;

DataID: 51 | doi:10.5066/F7BG2M16 | Date Posted Online: 2015-08-25 | Last Updated: 2017-08-08 15:34:09

Raw Ground Penetrating Radar Data, Valdez Glacier, Alaska; 2013

Common-offset GPR surveys were conducted with a Sensors and Software 500-MHz Pulse Ekko Pro system. We collected data from the ground, towed behind a researcher on skis or snowmobile, and from the air, strapped underneath a helicopter. All of the profiles are linked to coincident GPS observations. Coincident in-situ data is provided for calibration, and may be composed of any of the following: snow pits and/or snow-pit/snow-core combinations, probe profiles, and ablation stakes. This supplemental information may be used to calibrate velocity for conversion from time domain to depth domain. This supplemental information is provided as is, with additional information specific to usage included within the in-situ folder.

Author(s): Candela, S. G.; McGrath, D.; McNeil, C. J.; O'Neel, S. R.; Sass, L. C.; Wolken, G. J.; Loso, M. G.;

DataID: 52 | doi:10.5066/F7K072BV | Date Posted Online: 2015-08-25 | Last Updated: 2017-08-08 15:34:13

Raw Ground Penetrating Radar Data, Wolverine Glacier, Alaska; 2013

Common-offset GPR surveys were conducted with a Sensors and Software 500-MHz Pulse Ekko Pro system. We collected data from the ground, towed behind a researcher on skis or snowmobile, and from the air, strapped underneath a helicopter. All of the profiles are linked to coincident GPS observations. Coincident in-situ data is provided for calibration, and may be composed of any of the following: snow pits and/or snow-pit/snow-core combinations, probe profiles, and ablation stakes. This supplemental information may be used to calibrate velocity for conversion from time domain to depth domain. This supplemental information is provided as is, with additional information specific to usage included within the in-situ folder.

Author(s): Candela, S. G.; McGrath, D.; McNeil, C. J.; O'Neel, S. R.; Sass, L. C.; Wolken, G. J.; Loso, M. G.;

DataID: 53 | doi:10.5066/F7G73BRH | Date Posted Online: 2015-08-25 | Last Updated: 2017-08-08 15:34:15

Laysan Teal (Anas laysanensis) Microsatellite DNA Data; Laysan Island 1999-2009, Midway Atoll 2007-2010

The geographically closed, non-migratory populations of endangered Laysan Teal (Anas laysanensis) were sampled in the wild. This species was once widespread across the Hawaiian archipelago, but became isolated on Laysan Island (415 ha) from the mid-1800s until 2004 when a translocation to Midway Atoll (596 ha) was undertaken to reduce extinction risks. We compared genetic diversity and quantified variation at microsatellite loci sampled from 229 individuals from the wild populations at Laysan Island (1999–2009) and Midway Atoll (2007–2010; n = 133 Laysan, n = 96 Midway birds). We identified polymorphic markers by screening nuclear microsatellites (N = 83). Low nuclear variation was detected, consistent with the species’ insular isolation and historical bottleneck. Six of 83 microsatellites were polymorphic.

Author(s): Reynolds, M. H.; Pearce, J. M.;

DataID: 46 | doi:10.5066/F72Z13JP | Date Posted Online: 2015-07-28 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:47

Assessing the robustness of quantitative fatty acid signature analysis to assumption violations (Supplementary data)

This dataset contains fatty acid (FA) data expressed as mass percent of total FA for bearded seals, ringed seals and walrus. This is one of many datasets used in Bromaghin et al., In press, Assessing the robustness of quantitative fatty acid signature analysis to assumption violations, Methods in Ecology and Evolution. These supplemental data were used in computer simulations to compare the bias of several quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) estimators and develop recommendations regarding estimator selection.

Author(s): Bromaghin, J. F.; Budge, S. M.; Thiemann, G. W.; Rode, K. D.;

DataID: 44 | doi:10.5066/F7PR7T2W | Date Posted Online: 2015-07-23 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:44

North Pacific Pelagic Seabird Database 2.0 (NPPSD)

The North Pacific Pelagic Seabird Database (NPPSD) was created in 2005 to consolidate data on the oceanic distribution of marine bird species in the North Pacific. Most of these data were collected on surveys by counting species within defined areas and at known locations (that is, on strip transects). The NPPSD also contains observations of other bird species and marine mammals. The original NPPSD combined data from 465 surveys conducted between 1973 and 2002, primarily in waters adjacent to Alaska. These surveys included 61,195 sample transects with location, environment, and metadata information, and the data were organized in a flat-file format. In developing NPPSD 2.0, our goals were to add new datasets, to make significant improvements to database functionality and to provide the database online. NPPSD 2.0 includes data from a broader geographic range within the North Pacific, including new observations made offshore of the Russian Federation, Japan, Korea, British Columbia (Canada), Oregon, and California. These data were imported into a relational database, proofed, and structured in a common format. NPPSD 2.0 contains 351,674 samples (transects) collected between 1973 and 2012, representing a total sampled area of 270,259 square kilometers, and extends the time series of samples in some areas—notably the Bering Sea—to four decades. It contains observations of 16,988,138 birds and 235,545 marine mammals and is available from https://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7WQ01T3. Supplementary materials include an updated set of standardized taxonomic codes, reference maps that show the spatial and temporal distribution of the survey efforts and a query tool.

Author(s): Piatt, J. F.; Drew, G. S.;

DataID: 1 | doi:10.5066/F7WQ01T3 | Date Posted Online: 2015-07-10 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:13

U.S. Geological Survey Polar Bear Mark-Recapture Records, Alaska Portion of the Southern Beaufort Sea, 2001-2010

These data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Science Center, Polar Bear Research Program as part of long-term research on the southern Beaufort Sea polar bear population.

Author(s): Bromaghin, J. F.;

DataID: 7 | doi:10.5066/F7VQ30Q5 | Date Posted Online: 2015-03-28 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:21

Aerial Images of Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain; 1948-1949

This dataset is comprised of 36 black and white 9x9 inch aerial images of four different study areas on Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain taken between 1948-1949 and obtained from the Alaska Satellite Facility in 2013. The images represent an historical snapshot of the landscape from that time. The images were scanned and geo-referenced to various contemporary (2002-2010) satellite imagery using tie-point methods and splines for interpolation.

Author(s): Tape, K. D.;

DataID: 2 | doi:10.5066/F79021TB | Date Posted Online: 2015-03-05 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:20

Aerial Image of Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain; 1955

This dataset is comprised of a single aerial image of a single area on Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain taken on 21 June 1955 by the U.S. Air Force and obtained from the USGS EROS data center via the EarthExplorer website in 2013. The image represents an historical snapshot of the landscape from that time. The image was scanned and geo-referenced to various contemporary (2002-2010) satellite imagery using tie-point methods and splines for interpolation.

Author(s): Tape, K. D.;

DataID: 3 | doi:10.5066/F757192K | Date Posted Online: 2015-03-05 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:20

Aerial Images of Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain; 1974-1979

This dataset is comprised of 10 aerial images of three different study areas on Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain flown by NASA in 1974, 1977, 1979 and obtained from the USGS EROS Data Center via the EarthExplorer website in 2013. The images represent an historical snapshot of the landscape from that time. The images were scanned and georeferenced to various contemporary (2002-2010) satellite imagery using tie-point methods and splines for interpolation.

Author(s): Tape, K. D.;

DataID: 4 | doi:10.5066/F71G0J9D | Date Posted Online: 2015-03-05 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:20

Avian Habitat Data; Seward Peninsula, Alaska, 2012

This data product contains avian habitat data collected on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, USA, during 21 May – 10 June 2012. We conducted replicated 10-min surveys at 111 points located along 9 transects occurring over gradients of physical and biotic habitat conditions and recorded observations of individual birds identified to species. Survey points, or sites, were located approximately 500 m apart and observations of birds were limited to a maximum distance of 250 m to prevent double counting. We visited each survey site 2–3 times and assumed community closure within the survey period. Mean interval (±SD) between site-specific surveys was 5.8 ± 2.4 days. We measured 13 vegetative characteristics at 10 subsampling points associated with each bird survey location during 26 June – 11 July 2012. Five subsampling plots were located along each of two 20-m transects with random orientation (0–359 degrees). One transect originated at the bird survey point, and the other at a point selected randomly within 250 m of the bird survey point. At each subsampling point, we estimated overlapping coverages within six vegetation classes, including alder (Alnus spp.), dwarf birch (Betula spp.), ericaceous shrubs (e.g., Empetrum, Vaccinium spp.), herbaceous, lichen (e.g., Cladonia spp.), and willow (Salix spp.) using a 0.5-m2 quadrat frame, and recorded the height of the tallest plant of each type within the sampling frame. We recorded visual obstruction (VOR), an index of vegetation of height and density, at each subsampling point measured from a distance of 2 m and at a height of 0.5 m. Analyses of these data are published in: McNew, L. B., and C. M. Handel. 2015. Evaluating species richness: biased ecological inference results from spatial heterogeneity in species detection probabilities. Ecological Applications 25: in press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/14-1248.1

Author(s): McNew, L. B.; Handel, C. M.;

DataID: 5 | doi:10.5066/F7F18WS3 | Date Posted Online: 2015-01-30 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:20

Avian Point Transect Survey; Seward Peninsula, Alaska, 2012

This data product contains avian point-transect survey data and habitat data collected on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, USA, during 21 May – 10 June 2012. We conducted replicated 10-min surveys at 111 points located along 9 transects occurring over gradients of physical and biotic habitat conditions and recorded observations of individual birds identified to species. Survey points, or sites, were located approximately 500 m apart and observations of birds were limited to a maximum distance of 250 m to prevent double counting. We visited each survey site 2–3 times and assumed community closure within the survey period. Mean interval (±SD) between site-specific surveys was 5.8 ± 2.4 days. We measured 13 vegetative characteristics at 10 subsampling points associated with each bird survey location during 26 June – 11 July 2012. Five subsampling plots were located along each of two 20-m transects with random orientation (0–359 degrees). One transect originated at the bird survey point, and the other at a point selected randomly within 250 m of the bird survey point. At each subsampling point, we estimated overlapping coverages within six vegetation classes, including alder (Alnus spp.), dwarf birch (Betula spp.), ericaceous shrubs (e.g., Empetrum, Vaccinium spp.), herbaceous, lichen (e.g., Cladonia spp.), and willow (Salix spp.) using a 0.5-m2 quadrat frame, and recorded the height of the tallest plant of each type within the sampling frame. We recorded visual obstruction (VOR), an index of vegetation of height and density, at each subsampling point measured from a distance of 2 m and at a height of 0.5 m. Analyses of these data are published in: McNew, L. B., and C. M. Handel. 2015. Evaluating species richness: biased ecological inference results from spatial heterogeneity in species detection probabilities. Ecological Applications 25: in press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/14-1248.1

Author(s): McNew, L. B.; Handel, C. M.;

DataID: 6 | doi:10.5066/F7JS9NG2 | Date Posted Online: 2015-01-30 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:21

WildCast: Flight Paths Garmin

GPS waypoints delineating the flight paths for low altitude transects from a Garmin GPS unit. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska. Positions were collected at five second intervals.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 8 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:21

WildCast: Flight Paths Igotu

GPS waypoints delineating the flight paths for low altitude transects from a i-got-u GPS unit. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska. Positions were collected at five second intervals.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 9 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:22

WildCast: Flight Paths Google Location Maps

Maps portraying the flight paths for low altitude transects conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 10 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:22

WildCast: Flight Paths Google Overview Maps

Maps portraying the flight paths for low altitude transects conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 11 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:22

WildCast: Flight Paths @Trip Location Maps

Maps portraying the flight paths for low altitude transects conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 12 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:22

WildCast: Bering Drift Images - Nadir

Nadir images taken by automatic time-lapse from a Drift HD-170 (focal length 5.00 mm) and a GoPro Hero3 Black Edition (focal length 2.77 mm) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects at five second intervals. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 13 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:23

WildCast: Bering GoPro Images - Nadir

Nadir images taken by automatic time-lapse from a Drift HD-170 (focal length 5.00 mm) and a GoPro Hero3 Black Edition (focal length 2.77 mm) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects at five second intervals. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 14 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:23

WildCast: Kobuk Drift Images - Nadir

Nadir images taken by automatic time-lapse from a Drift HD-170 (focal length 5.00 mm) and a GoPro Hero3 Black Edition (focal length 2.77 mm) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects at five second intervals. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 15 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:23

WildCast: Kobuk GoPro Images - Nadir

Nadir images taken by automatic time-lapse from a Drift HD-170 (focal length 5.00 mm) and a GoPro Hero3 Black Edition (focal length 2.77 mm) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects at five second intervals. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 16 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:24

WildCast: Noatak Drift Images - Nadir

Nadir images taken by automatic time-lapse from a Drift HD-170 (focal length 5.00 mm) and a GoPro Hero3 Black Edition (focal length 2.77 mm) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects at five second intervals. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 17 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:24

WildCast: Noatak GoPro Images - Nadir

Nadir images taken by automatic time-lapse from a Drift HD-170 (focal length 5.00 mm) and a GoPro Hero3 Black Edition (focal length 2.77 mm) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects at five second intervals. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 18 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:24

WildCast: Bering GoPro MP4 Videos - Nadir

Nadir videos shot from a GoPro Hero3 Black Edition (focal length 2.77 mm) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects at the rate of 60 frames per second. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Bering Land Bridge National Preserve and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 19 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:24

WildCast: Bering GoPro WMV Videos - Nadir

Nadir videos shot from a GoPro Hero3 Black Edition (focal length 2.77 mm) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects at the rate of 60 frames per second. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Bering Land Bridge National Preserve and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 20 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:25

WildCast: Kobuk GoPro MP4 Videos - Nadir

Nadir videos shot from a GoPro Hero3 Black Edition (focal length 2.77 mm) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects at the rate of 60 frames per second. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Bering Land Bridge National Preserve and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 21 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:25

WildCast: Kobuk GoPro MP4 Videos - Nadir

Nadir videos shot from a GoPro Hero3 Black Edition (focal length 2.77 mm) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects at the rate of 60 frames per second. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Bering Land Bridge National Preserve and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 22 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:25

WildCast: Bering Canon Images - Oblique

Oblique images snapped from a Canon Rebel 3Ti with a Sigma zoom lens (18-200mm focal length), a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service's Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 23 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:26

WildCast: Bering Panfz Images - Oblique

Oblique images snapped from a Canon Rebel 3Ti with a Sigma zoom lens (18-200mm focal length), a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service's Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 24 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:26

WildCast: Bering Pansz7 Images - Oblique

Oblique images snapped from a Canon Rebel 3Ti with a Sigma zoom lens (18-200mm focal length), a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service's Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 25 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:26

WildCast: Kobuk Canon Images - Oblique

Oblique images snapped from a Canon Rebel 3Ti with a Sigma zoom lens (18-200mm focal length), a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service's Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 26 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:26

WildCast: Kobuk Panfz Images - Oblique

Oblique images snapped from a Canon Rebel 3Ti with a Sigma zoom lens (18-200mm focal length), a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service's Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 27 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:39

WildCast: Kobuk Pansz7 Images - Oblique

Oblique images snapped from a Canon Rebel 3Ti with a Sigma zoom lens (18-200mm focal length), a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service's Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 28 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:36

WildCast: Noatak Canon Images - Oblique

Oblique images snapped from a Canon Rebel 3Ti with a Sigma zoom lens (18-200mm focal length), a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service's Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 29 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:36

WildCast: Noatak Panfz Images - Oblique

Oblique images snapped from a Canon Rebel 3Ti with a Sigma zoom lens (18-200mm focal length), a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service's Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 30 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:27

WildCast: Noatak Pansz7 Images - Oblique

Oblique images snapped from a Canon Rebel 3Ti with a Sigma zoom lens (18-200mm focal length), a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service's Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 31 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:27

WildCast: Bering Panfz MP4 Videos - Oblique

Oblique videos shot from a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length)) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 32 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:27

WildCast: Bering Panfz WMV Videos - Oblique

Oblique videos shot from a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length)) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 33 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:28

WildCast: Bering Pansz7 MP4 Videos - Oblique

Oblique videos shot from a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length)) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 34 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:28

WildCast: Bering Pansz7 WMV Videos - Oblique

Oblique videos shot from a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length)) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 35 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:28

WildCast: Kobuk Panfz MP4 Videos - Oblique

Oblique videos shot from a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length)) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 36 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:28

WildCast: Kobuk Panfz WMV Videos - Oblique

Oblique videos shot from a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length)) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 37 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:29

WildCast: Kobuk Pansz7 MP4 Videos - Oblique

Oblique videos shot from a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length)) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 38 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:29

WildCast: Kobuk Pansz7 WMV Videos - Oblique

Oblique videos shot from a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length)) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 39 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:29

WildCast: Noatak Panfz MP4 Videos - Oblique

Oblique videos shot from a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length)) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 40 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:32

WildCast: Noatak Panfz WMV Videos - Oblique

Oblique videos shot from a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 (24x superzoom with variable focal length) and a Panasonic Lumix DMC-SZ7 (10x superzoom with variable focal length)) of the arctic landscape during low altitude transects. Transects were conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska.

Author(s): Marcot, B. G.; Jorgenson, M. T.; DeGange, A. R.;

DataID: 41 | Date Posted Online: 2014-09-19 | Last Updated: 2017-03-15 15:24:43

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