USGS - science for a changing world

Alaska Science Center

white dothome: white dotproducts: white dotoutreach/media: white dotcontact us:   white dotinternal:


Northern Pintail

Northern PintailEarly on, the USGS identified the Northern Pintail as a model species to test the hypothesis that wild birds play a role in the dispersal of avian influenza viruses between continents.  Northern Pintails are one of the most common waterfowl species, breeding throughout high latitudes of Russian and Alaska and wintering throughout Asia and the lower-48 U.S. USGS research in the U.S. and Japan determined Northern Pintails are highly migratory, with satellite telemetry and band recovery data finding movement of pintails between East Asia and North America. Population genetic and banding data demonstrated that East Asia and Pacific U.S. populations are essentially one group that partially overlaps in northeastern Russia during the summer. In 2008, the USGS conducted genetic sequencing of avian influenza viruses isolated from pintails in Alaska and revealed a high frequency of Eurasian genes, suggesting viral gene flow between Asian and North America (See Koehler et al. 2008 below). Ongoing USGS Alaska Science Center research continues to provide support for maintaining Northern Pintails as a species of interest in surveillance efforts for foreign-origin pathogens into North America.

Ramey, A. M., A. B. Reeves, S. A. Sonsthagen, J. L. TeSlaa, S. Nashold, T. F. Donnelly, B. Casler, and J. S. Hall. 2015. Dispersal of H9N2 influenza A viruses between East Asia and North America by wild birds. Virology 482:79-83. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2015.03.028 [Details] [Full Publication]

Ramey, A. M., E. Spackman, J-Y. Yeh, G. Fujita, K. Konishi, K. Uchida, J. A. Reed, B. R. Wilcox, J. D. Brown, and D. E. Stallknecht. 2013. Antibodies to H5 subtype avian influenza virus and Japanese encephalitis virus in Northern Pintails (Anas acuta) sampled in Japan. Japanese Journal of Veterinary Research 61(3):117-123. [Details] [Full Publication]

Hupp, J. W., N. Yamaguchi, P. L. Flint, J. M. Pearce, K. Tokita, T. Shimada, A. M. Ramey, S. Kharitonov, and H. Higuchi. 2011. Variation in spring migration routes and breeding distribution of Northern Pintails Anas acuta that winter in Japan. Journal of Avian Biology 42:289-300. doi:10.1111/j.1600-048X.2011.05320.x [Details] [Full Publication]

Ramey, A. M., J. M. Pearce, P. L. Flint, H. S. Ip, D. V. Derksen, J. C. Franson, M. J. Petrula, B. D. Scotton, K. M. Sowl, M. L. Wege, and K. A. Trust. 2010. Intercontinental reassortment and genomic variation of low pathogenic avian influenza viruses isolated from Northern Pintails (Anas acuta) in Alaska: Examining the evidence through space and time. Virology 401(2):179-189. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2010.02.006 [Details] [Full Publication]

Feeding Whooper Swans and Pintail Ducks in Japan

Yamaguchi, N. M., J. W. Hupp, H. Higuchi, P. L. Flint, and J. M. Pearce. 2010. Satellite-tracking of Northern Pintail Anas acuta during outbreaks of the H5N1 virus in Japan: Implications for virus spread. Ibis 152:262-271. [Details] [Full Publication]

Flint, P. L., P. Ozaki, J. M. Pearce, B. M. Guzzetti, H. Higuchi, J. P. Fleskes, T. Shimada, and D. V. Derksen. 2009. Breeding season sympatry in Northern Pintails facilitates genetic exchange among allopatric wintering populations in Japan and California. Condor 111(4):591-598. doi:10.1525/cond.2009.090100 [Details] [Full Publication]

Pearce, J. M., A. M. Ramey, P. L. Flint, A. V. Koehler, J. P. Fleskes, J. C. Franson, J. S. Hall, D. V. Derksen, and H. S. Ip. 2009. Avian influenza at both ends of a migratory flyway: Characterizing viral genomic diversity to optimize surveillance plans for North America. Evolutionary Applications 2(4):457-468. doi:10.1111/j.1752-4571.2009.00071.x [Details] [Full Publication]

Koehler, A. V., J. M. Pearce, H. S. Ip, P. L. Flint, and J. C. Franson. 2008. Genetic evidence of intercontinental dispersal of avian influenza by a migratory bird: the Northern Pintail (Anas acuta). Molecular Ecology 17:4754-4762. doi:10.1111/j.1365-294x.2008.03953.x [Details] [Full Publication]

 

Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

USA.gov logo U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
URL: https://alaska.usgs.gov/science/biology/avian_influenza/migration/northern_pintail.php
Page Contact Information: ascweb@usgs.gov
Page Last Modified: December 06 2016 09:36:41.